The Case for Kindles

For the longest time, I only had disdain for Kindles and other eReaders. “Nothing can ever replace books,” I said, “Books are the best and reading on a screen is dumb.”

Well crap, I was kind of wrong. Don’t misunderstand me – I love paper books and my bookshelf is my favorite thing in my apartment. In Nov. 2015, I was scrolling through Amazon on Cyber Monday and I noticed there was a great deal for Kindles. I knew that I wanted to travel sometime soon and that I’d want to travel as light as possible. You just can’t do that when you’re carrying a bunch of books. So, I grit my teeth and bought it.

And you know what happened? I ended up loving it. I got one that is only 6″ tall, glare free, and there’s no backlight, so it looks as if you’re actually reading a paper page. I needed it to be easy on the eyes because I like to read at night before I go to sleep and I already spend all day looking at a computer. The battery lasts for a whopping three weeks, so unless you’re traveling for very long periods of time, you don’t even need to bring a charging cable with you.

It’s small enough to fit in most purses or large coat pockets, so it’s perfect for traveling light. If you’re laying in bed, you’ll never drop the book and lose your place. Even if you’re reading a 600 page book, it’s as light as a feather, which makes it perfect for elderly people who can’t lift a lot (bonus: you can make any book large print), and you’ll never get a paper cut.

My sister and I went to the Netherlands last year and we only took a backpack each as our luggage (honestly, it’s the best way to travel – the airline can’t lose your carry-on). I was so glad I brought my Kindle with me on the trip. I downloaded several books before we left, so even though I finished a book on the flight back, I didn’t even have to pause before I started the next one. I carried the Kindle around just about everywhere we went. It fit perfectly in my purse and I even carried in my rain jacket pocket sometimes.

I don’t just use it for traveling though. I took it to work and I’d read it during lunch. None of my coworkers knew that I was reading romantic trash novels if they couldn’t see a cover. That’s actually one of the best things about the Kindle. You can read whatever trash you love most without fear of judgment from other people, because for all they know, you’re actually reading Anna Karenina or some other tome instead of the latest Lisa Kleypas novel.

The Kindle versions are also cheaper than the hard copies. I bought all eight Outlander books because I wanted to have my own collection (my mom owns the hard copies) and be able to carry them around with me whenever I want. They’re excellent travel books because they’re long and engrossing – perfect for long flights – so I was able to save money by downloading the Kindle versions.

There are also a ton of free Kindle books on Amazon. They’re not all great, in fact, most of them are self-published and not good, but you might be able to find some free gems. Amazon also has this new thing called Prime Reading, where if you have a Kindle device (or the app) and Amazon Prime, you can “borrow” books indefinitely on your Kindle and then you just “return” them when you’re done.

I’m a big fan of my Kindle. It’s light, small, and does exactly what I need it to do, which is let me read, not hurt my eyes, and travel well. So far, it’s been perfect!

How to Deal When Someone In Your Family Is Voting for a Sentient Cheeto

First of all, I heard the phrase “sentient Cheeto” on one of my favorite podcasts, Call Your Girlfriend, and it became my favorite descriptor for Ivanka’s Dad (they also call him Ivanka’s Dad and it makes me really happy and I’m just gonna borrow these phrases from them).

One of my family members recently e-mailed the entire family and said that he is in the basket of deplorables (no one asked for his political views, by the way). Months ago, he sent out an e-mail saying how he supported Bernie and even though I voted for Hillary, I was proud of having so many Bernie supporters in the family. Now I’m completely confused how he went from supporting Bernie because of his view on the environment and universal healthcare, to saying he’d vote for someone who wants to get rid of the EPA and also basically delete Planned Parenthood off the face of the Earth! I suspect brainwashing.

Thankfully, the collective outrage that has come from the rest of my family has given me hope for the rest of the world. Though, some of them are voting for Jill Stein instead, which is a whole other splitting-the-vote problem that I can’t even get into right now because I’m too busy being glad that they aren’t voting for an orangutan in a suit.

Here are the best ways to cope with the fact that you’re related to someone voting for Donald Trump:

1. Wine.

Wine is the only thing that will get you through the next month and a half until Election Day. It’s TBD if we’re going to need wine to drown our sorrows or for celebrating after Election Day. Stay tuned.

2. Group message your other relatives and ask if you can disown them.

Haha! Joke’s on you, Grandpa. You can try to write me out of your will, but not before I write myself out of it and deny all relation.

3. Get adopted by a different family.

If you really want to anger this Trump voter, get adopted by a nice Mexican family.

4. Make a donation in their name to the Hillary Clinton campaign.

You’ll be doing good to offset their badness, plus it’ll piss them off that their name is attached to Clinton campaign. *cackle*

5. Go out and vote on November 8th.

At some point, you’re going to realize that you can’t change their mind no matter how much you try. The best thing you can do is register to vote and cast a ballot against the orangutan in a suit.

Seriously, everyone. Voting is one of the most important things you can do. Register to vote today and don’t forget to cast your ballot on November 8th (or earlier if you’re voting absentee).